X-Ray Technician Training

X-Ray tech schools teach students everything they need to know about radiography. Many states also require a license or certification by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists before you can accept employment as an Xray technician. In addition to x-ray tech schools, training for this field is offered by hospitals, colleges and universities, and vocational-technical institutes. X-ray tech schools offer instruction in anatomy, physiology, patient care procedures, radiation physics, radiation protection, medical terminology, radiobiology, and pathology. In addition to these courses, you will also receive instruction in the proper positioning of patients, medical ethics, and the principles of imaging. Programs to become an xray technician take as little as one and as much as four years to complete.

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An X-Ray Technician (also called Radiologists, Radiographers, Radiologic Technologist) produce X-ray images of all parts of the human body to aid physicians in the diagnosis of medical conditions. They prepare and position patients/clients, expose and develop radiographic films. Additional diagnostic imaging techniques such as computer tomography, magnetic resonance, special angiographic and interventional procedures, ultrasound, and nuclear medicine procedures are also performed. Radiologic tech is one of the fastest growing occupations requiring post-secondary or associate’s degree training. Job opportunities are, and will continue to be, excellent.

Is a college degree worth it? Any way you measure it, a college degree is the best investment of your life. In today’s dollars, a bachelor’s degree is worth more than $2.1 million over 40 years. “Having that post-secondary diploma can make such a difference in lifetime earnings,” said Washington, D.C.-based Employment Policy Foundation President Ed Potter.

During a recession, obtaining a college degree becomes even more crucial. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, all seven of the job categories that are predicted to grow faster than average during the next decade require a college diploma. These careers, which include teaching, healthcare and technology, will account for 42 percent of the nation’s projected job growth by 2013.

Conversely, men and women without a post-secondary degree are losing ground. The Department of Labor reports that employments for those with bachelor’s degrees grew by 1.8 million during the past 10 years compared to a loss of nearly 700,000 jobs for those armed with a high school diploma.

But earnings are only part of the benefits. A college education enriches your life in ways that cannot be measured by dollars. “Education is power,” Frederick Douglass observed nearly 150 years ago. Today, education remains the path out of poverty toward opportunity. It is also the route to achievement, enrichment, knowledge and success. Most important of all, education makes dreams come true.

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Whether personal or practical, the college experience can be both life affirming and career enhancing. The classroom and the coursework expose you to diverse people and ideas. They open up a world that challenges and stimulates you in ways both big and small. You’ll discover new interests or pursue familiar subjects with passion and depth. Business, history, literature, teaching, medicine, technology, the arts — the list is endless. Along the way, your knowledge base expands, your critical-thinking skills become sharper and your confidence grows.

And once earned, a college degree is forever, as the payoff from higher education can never be erased, broken or laid off.

Here are a few examples of that payoff:

  • A career that is professionally satisfying and intellectually stimulating; one that taps into your potential and challenges you to perform at your peak.
  • A profession that is in demand with upwardly mobile opportunities.
  • An arsenal of skills that empower you to control the pace and direction of your career.
  • A secure future that comes with a steady profession that can ride out any economic roller coaster.

Even during a recession, the U.S. Bureau of Labor projects that 23 million jobs will be created in the next decade. Management-related occupations will account for nearly a third of the total, according to the Employment Policy Foundation, a non-profit, non-partisan research and educational foundation focusing on workplace trends and policies.

In addition, a just-completed survey conducted for the Chronicle of Higher Education shows that despite unease with the economy, Americans faith in higher education is unwavering. The nation continues to have confidence in the value of a college degree, with more than half of respondents saying it is “essential for success.” Your future depends on it.

Down Economy

During a recession, obtaining a college degree becomes even more crucial. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, all seven of the job categories that are predicted to grow faster than average during the next decade require a college diploma. These careers, which include teaching, healthcare and technology, will account for 42 percent of the nation’s projected job growth by 2013.